University of Memphis interns complete projects at Delta Heritage Center

University of Memphis interns complete projects at Delta Heritage Center

University of Memphis interns complete projects at Delta Heritage Center

The West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center is pleased to announce a recent internship with four University of Memphis graduate students has resulted in two new exhibitions, an audio tour and collections research. Working towards their certification in Museum Studies, each student worked virtually and on site to complete the internships.

Neecole A. Gregory

Neecole A. Gregory, from Hebron, Maryland, is working towards her Master’s degree in Art History with a concentration in Museum Practice. Through her internship, she was able to design an exhibit based on the folklore of West Tennessee. The focus of this exhibit is hoodoo and its practitioners. The exhibit, “Hoodoo: The Tracing of the Origins and Practices of Hoodoo in West Tennessee,” shows visitors the true nature of hoodoo as an established system of practices of healing and spirituality as well as its place in West Tennessee history. The exhibit features artifacts on loan from the West Tennessee Museum of Southern Hoodoo History.

Objects such as Erbo Powder, used to heal stomach pains by consuming the powder or drinking it in a tea, can be seen in the exhibit “Hoodoo: The Tracing of the Origins and Practices of Hoodoo in West Tennessee.” Dart heads such as these would have been used during the Archaic Period (8000-1000 BCE) for hunting game. These and other items such as pottery are included in the exhibit “Those Who Came Before”

JoLynne Minnick

JoLynne Minnick is from Washington (state) and a graduate student working towards a Masters in Art History: Egyptian Art and Archaeology with a Museum Certificate. Minnick has put together an exhibition highlighting the archeology of West Tennessee. “Those Who Came Before: Archaeology and Material Culture of the Ancient People of West Tennessee” tells of the evolution of material cultures in West Tennessee. Through sherds and intact pottery, projectile points, and stone tools, you can experience centuries of habitation and a small view of the lives of the indigenous people of the area.

Both exhibitions will be on display in the Center lobby through the end of December 2020.

Rachel Wilson

Rachel Wilson is from Indiana and earning her Masters in Art History with a concentration in Egyptian Art and Archaeology with a Museum Certificate. Her internship involved researching each item in the Hatchie River collection to expand the information for an online database, as well as writing research papers on 5 of the objects. Wilson’s research will be available online in 2021.

Christine Wunrow

Christine Wunrow is from the greater Memphis area and lives near Oakland, TN. In May 2020, she graduated from the University of Memphis with a Master’s in Anthropology, and is now finishing her certificate in Museum Studies. Her internship has resulted in researched and written audio tour segments on the Hatchie Room, the Cotton Room, the Music Room, Flagg Grove School and the Sleepy John Estes home. The tour incorporates QR codes with items in the collection and will be accessible via smart phones for those touring the facility in 2021.

Guests are welcome to visit Tuesday – Saturday, 9 am – 5 pm, and Sundays 1-5 pm. Face coverings and social distancing is required. For more information, call 731-779-9000 or visit westtnheritage.com.

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