2011 May 19 Archive: Summer 2011

Archive: Summer 2011

Archive: Summer 2011

Brownsville’s Downtown program formulating work
August 29, 2011

City of Brownsville Planning Consultant Sharon
Hayes told the Brownsville Planning Board that the local steering group for the Tennessee Downtown Program sponsored by the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development has established five goals for its work in Brownsville over the next year.
Those are
(1) to address development of vacant lots
(2) providing Wi – Fi access for the downtown area
(3) making proposals for customer driven retail businesses
(4) to establish recommendations for way-finding and commercial signage
(5) to address the structural integrity of downtown buildings.
There will be a regional meeting of the Tennessee Downtown Program in Jackson on September 27.  Contact Ms. Hayes at City Hall for more information on the Downtown Program.

Brownsville’s government makes industrial recruitment cash available
August 10, 2011

The City of Brownsville Mayor and Board of Alderman held a quick, forty-five minute meeting on Tuesday afternoon at City Hall as they breezed through a short and uncontroversial agenda.

They unanimously passed a new ordinance tightly regulating construction in designated flood areas of Brownsville.

The Board also passed a resolution authorizing payment of $25,000 to the Industrial Development Board for passing on to Marathon Heater, Inc., to be utilized by Marathon for the transfer of equipment from Pennsylvania to Brownsville.  Marathon has agreed to occupy the premises formerly used by Haywood Element, which recently closed operations here.

Marathon expects to employ 50 to 60 people in Brownsville once there operations are underway here.  The Haywood County Commission is matching the $25,000 authorized by the City to facilitate the move of the industry to the local industrial park.

Also on the agenda was the appointment of several people to various boards and commissions.  Lynn Shaw and Carrie parker were appointed to the Historic Zoning Commission.  Linda Freeman was appointed to the Beer Board, and Mary Ann Pennel was appointed to the Animal Shelter Board.  Julie Dahlhauser (Chairman), John Muether (Treasurer) , and Goldie Harwell received appointments to the Elma Ross Public Library Board.

The revolving Loan Fund Board, consisting of Tim Stokely, Mark Halbrook, and Della Ligon, will assist in the management of UDAG grant funds available to the City.

After a period of some dormancy, the City reestablished the City Beautiful Commission.  The members are Walter Battle, Jane K. Watson, Sheri Richards, Barrow Taylor, Keith Walker, J.P. Hathcock, Gem Bell, Nancy Cates, and Carolyn Flagg.

Near the conclusion of the brief meeting, Alderman Carolyn Flagg announced her retirement from chairmanship of the local Relay For Life fundraising efforts in the fight against cancer.  Alderman Flagg has held the position for over a decade, and the mayor and her colleagues on the Board of Aldermen praised her for her tireless, steadfast efforts for so many years in this area of valuable community service.

Finally, as of August first electric rates for customers of Brownsville Utility Department increased by one half of one per cent.

 

Civil War Cavalry exhibit coming to West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center

BROWNSVILLE, TN (AUGUST 8, 2011) – The traveling exhibition “Hoofbeats in the Heartland: Civil War Cavalry in Tennessee” will open at the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center, in Brownsville, Tenn., Wednesday, August 24. The exhibit is organized by the Tennessee State Museum and funded in part by a grant from the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area.

Hoofbeats in the Heartland will look at how Tennessee’s strategic location would make it a major battleground of the Western Theater. As both sides maneuvered, raided, fought, and occupied the state, nearly every community experienced the heavy hand of war. While few communities witnessed large battles, nearly every community experienced soldiers on horseback as part of a raiding force, occupying army, or as members of the numerous guerilla or partisan bands.

The exhibition Hoofbeats in the Heartland will introduce the soldiers and the evolution of cavalry tactics in the Civil War. Visitors to the exhibit will meet the leaders such as Nathan Bedford Forrest and John Wilder and learn how their personalities affected the mounted warfare. Learn about the typical cavalry trooper, the nearly one million horses and mules that died during the Civil War and the mounted spies and scouts used to gain intelligence about the opposition.

Throughout the state both sides dealt with small bands of guerilla or partisan fighters mounted on horseback. These groups, some holding legitimate commissions from their respective governments, manifested in nearly every Tennessee county.

Visitors will also learn how the homefront sometimes became the frontlines and the role of the African-American troops. Significant battles will also be discussed including Fort Pillow in West Tennessee.

Hoofbeats in the Heartland will remain on display at the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center until October 31. The Center is a tourist information center and three regional museums located off of Interstate 40 at Exit 56 in Brownsville. The Center is open seven days a week and is free to the public. For more information, call 731-779-9000 or visitwww.westtnheritage.com.

CAPTION: A cavalry and military commander in the war, Nathan Bedford Forrest is one of the war’s most unusual figures. He was one of the few officers in either army to enlist as a private and be promoted to general officer and division commander by the end of the war.

 

Dozens of jobs coming to Brownsville!
Marathon Heater to open here
August 5, 2011

The Brownsville/Haywood County Chamber of Commerce announced today that Marathon Heaters, a Texas based company, will open in the former Haywood Element building in the industrial park.

Brownsville Haywood County Chamber Director Joe Ing says an official announcement and details will follow.
Haywood Element closed just a few weeks ago, idling about thirty workers. Marathon will employ 50 to 60 people and Ing is hopeful that many of the former Haywood Element workers will find work with Marathon.

A local government incentive may have helped close the Marathon deal. Brownsville and Haywood County, via the Brownsville Industrial Board, provided $50,000 to the company to help move equipment to the Brownsville plant.

John Finn, the former manager of Haywood Element, will manage the facility for Marathon

According to their Internet site, Marathon Heater, Inc. was founded in 1996 with three employees and one product: cartridge heaters.

In 2002 Marathon was selected by Inc. magazine as one of the 500 fastest growing privately held companies in the United States.

Marathon currently has 2 manufacturing locations, their 40,000 square foot headquarters in Del Rio, TX and a 12,000 square foot manufacturing facility in Udaipur, India.

 

Clark extends education with annual program on Georgia Campus

DAHLONEGA, Ga. (August 2011) —Sonia Outlaw-Clark, director of the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center, has completed the second year of a three-year professional development program that will lead to certification as a Tourism Marketing Professional (TMP).

Clark was one of 232 tourism professionals enrolled at the Southeast Tourism Society Marketing College last month.  The week-long program turns the facilities of North Georgia College and State University in Dahlonega, Ga., into a laboratory to teach tourism marketing each summer.

There is no other professional development program like STS Marketing College, and it is recognized nationally for its training of tourism leaders. 626 people have earned TMP certification.

“In the tourism industry, TMP certification carries a lot of weight,” said Bill Hardman, president and CEO of the Southeast Tourism Society, a 12-state organization that promotes travel and tourism in the Southeast.

The STS Marketing College began in 1992 to provide continuing education for tourism professionals and feted its 20th anniversary this year.  Tourism ranks as the first-, second- or third-largest industry in each STS member state. Students come from convention and visitors bureaus, chambers of commerce, attractions, hotels and other segments of the tourism industry.

The curriculum covers topics such as branding, social media, packaging and sports marketing.  Heritage tourism and research are courses that have attracted special interest in recent years.

“The fundamental concept of STS Marketing College is that the curriculum is practical.  What students learn can be put to practice as soon as they get back to their workplaces,” Hardman said.

Twenty-four senior executives in the travel and tourism industry were the volunteer faculty.

The program attracts students from throughout the Southeast and occasionally from other states.  This year’s program included students from Maryland and Oklahoma.

“Southeast Tourism Society is recognized nationwide for the cohesiveness and camaraderie it fosters in the region.  No other region in the U.S. has a similar organization.  STS Marketing College is a major project to build skills and professionalism in the tourism industry,” Hardman said.

Southeast Tourism Society, created in 1983, is headquartered in Atlanta and has approximately 800 members who represent travel industry businesses, state tourism departments, chambers of commerce, convention and visitors bureaus and travel media. Its activities include cooperative marketing programs, continuing education, professional development and travel industry policy advocacy. More about STS can be found at http://southeasttourism.org.

The 12 STS states are Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.

CUTLINE: Sonia Outlaw-Clark, director of the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center is among three area tourism professionals who have completed their second year of STS Marketing College in Dahlonega, Georgia. Pictured with Clark are (from left) Jackson Tenn. Convention and Visitors Bureau Director Lori Nunnery, Clark, STS Vice President of Communications and Public Relations Neville Bhada, and Shiloh National Military Park Superintendent Woody Harrell.

 

Bluegrass featured at August “Concert on the Porch”

Join the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center in Brownsville, Tenn., for the fourth in its ‘Concert on the Porch’ series Saturday, August 20, beginning at 7 p.m. This month’s concert will feature Wildwood Express, a group of five area musicians who perform the old time stringed music of yesterday. Also appearing with Wildwood Express will be 11-year-old Emma Webb of Memphis.

The concert will open with Webb. Webb is part of the Generation Next series of the Memphis & Shelby County Music Commission and she is also the youngest member of the Memphis Songwriters Association. Webb has been performing in the Memphis area since she was 8. Her performances include music from the 80s to current pop songs plus some originals.

Wildwood Express performs the old time stringed music including bluegrass gospel, instrumentals and old time country. Their instruments of choice include the banjo, dulcimer, mandolin, upright bass and guitar.

The band is made up of Grover Westover, of Brownsville, who does vocals and plays guitar. Paul Jackson is from Bells, Tenn., and does vocals and plays mandolin.  Gary Spraggins is on the upright bass and is from Alamo, Tenn.  Coley and Marilyn Graves are from Bartlett, Tenn.; Coley does vocals, guitar and banjo, while his wife, Marilyn plays the hammered dulcimer. All are members of the Jackson Tennessee Area Plectral Society whose main purpose is the preservation of old time stringed music.

Everyone is invited to this free event. Bring your lawn chairs or blanket and enjoy an evening of old-time music. For more information, call the Center at 731-779-9000 or visit online at www.westtnheritage.com.

The West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center is a visitor’s center and three regional museum located off of Interstate 40 at Exit 56, behind McDonald’s, in Brownsville, Tenn. “Concert on the Porch” is offered May through September and is presented from the porch of the “Sleepy” John Adam Estes home located on the grounds.

 

Brownsville’s Hatchie Fall Fest set for October 15

With over 8,000 attending last year’s Hatchie Fall Fest, this year promises to be bigger and better than ever. Held annually on the historic court square in Brownsville, Tenn., this year’s event will be Saturday, October 15. It will be a fun-filled day of kid’s games and activities, cooking and eating contests, live music, arts and crafts, a quilt show and more.

One of the most popular festival events is the Frozen T-shirt Contest. Enjoyed by all ages, participants compete to see who gets the frozen t-shirt on the fastest. The Pet Show and Blessing of the Pets is another event that adults and kids both flock to.

Are you a good cook? You can show off your skills at the cake and pie-baking contest. Maybe you’d rather try your eating skills during the hot salsa-eating contest? While the kids are busy in the bouncy houses, getting their face painted and enjoying the many games and activities, you can find great bargains at the more than 100 arts and crafts booths and local merchant’s sidewalk sales. For a bit of nostalgia, visit the “Heritage Quilts of West Tennessee” exhibit featuring heirloom and modern day fabric creations.

The fun starts at 10 a.m., and continues all day, including live performances from the main stage area: local and regional performers singing your favorite gospel, country, blues and rock melodies.

During this year’s festival you will also be able to visit Oneal Lake on the Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge and participate in an Amateur Radio event. The ham radio operators will be celebrating National Wildlife Refuge Week and the rich cultural heritage and significance of the Hatchie River.

The fun continues on Sunday when the Elma Ross Public Library parking lot gets revved up for the 32nd annual Tennessee Trash Car Show. Classic and show cars from all over attend this show that has been happening in Haywood County since 1979.

The Hatchie Fall Fest is held annually on the third Saturday of October. Admission to the festival is free and open to everyone. For more information and a complete schedule of events, visit www.hatchiefallfest.com.

CAPTION:  During the annual Hatchie Fall Fest, events and activities are planned for all age groups including the kids. Children’s activities include bouncy houses, a petting zoo, games, face painting and more.

 

Texas Family Joins the Fun at Concert on the Porch

The West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center was honored to welcome guests from Cut and Shoot, Texas, during its July 16 “Concert on the Porch.” Gary Christianberry and his family were vacationing in Tennessee when they decided to stop in Brownsville for the night. During their stay, the family enjoyed a tour of the Center’s three museums and a Southern Gospel concert from the porch of the “Sleepy” John Estes home.

Pictured with Christianberry, outside of the Center, are his wife, Julie, and children, Joshua and Chelsea.

 

Tennessee Downtowns Program Launches in Brownsville

Tennessee Main Street Program Director, National Trust Main Street Officer Conduct On-Site Assessment

BROWNSVILLE, TN (July 23, 2011) Tennessee Main Street Program Director Kimberly Nyberg, National Trust Main Street Center Officer Kathy LaPlante and Bridgett Massengill, Massengill Consulting, conducted an initial assessment visit in Brownsville July 19, to launch the Tennessee Downtowns program. Brownsville is one of 12 communities selected to participate in Tennessee Downtowns, a competitive community improvement program for cities and counties seeking to revitalize traditional commercial districts.

“The National Trust Main Street Center applauds Brownsville for embracing the revitalization of its downtown commercial district, and we look forward to hearing many success stories here and across the state as a result of Tennessee Downtowns,” said LaPlante.

Tennessee Downtowns is a tiered program affiliated with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development’s Tennessee Main Street Program. Communities selected to participate in Tennessee Downtowns are home to downtown commercial districts established at least 50 years ago and have demonstrated their readiness to organize efforts for downtown revitalization based on the successful “Main Street Four-Point Approach to Downtown Revitalizationtm.”

“Tennessee Downtowns is a unique opportunity for Brownsville to take the initial steps toward revitalizing its downtown business district,” said Nyberg. “I would like to congratulate Brownsville again on being selected to participate in Tennessee Downtowns and look forward to working with you in the coming months.”

Main Street revitalization is a comprehensive, incremental, self-help economic strategy that also focuses on developing public-private partnerships to enhance community livability and job creation, while maintaining the historic character of the district. For information about the Main Street Program and the Main Street Four Point Approach, visit http://www.preservationnation.org/main-street/about-main-street/.

Tennessee’s Main Street program provides communities with technical assistance and guidance in developing long-term strategies that promote economic growth and development. The program provides information and assistance in forging public networking and training opportunities for downtown commercial districts.

For more information about Tennessee Downtowns, visit www.tennesseemainstreet.org.

About the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development’s mission is to develop strategies which help make Tennessee the No. 1 location in the Southeast for high quality jobs. The department seeks to attract new corporate investment in Tennessee and works with Tennessee companies to facilitate expansion and economic growth. To find out more, go to www.tn.gov/ecd.

Brownsville’s Tennessee Downtowns Steering Committee met with Tennessee Main Street Program Director Kimberly Nyberg, National Trust Main Street Center Officer Kathy LaPlante and Bridgett Massengill, Massengill Consulting, July 19, to do an initial site assessment and officially launch the Tennessee Downtowns program in Brownsville. Pictured (from left) are Hayden Hooper, Pat Cummins, Nyberg, Pat Bailey, John Ashworth, Sonia Outlaw-Clark, Sharon Hayes, Andrea Barbour, Albert Campbell, LaPlante, Mayor Jo Matherne and Massengill.

STEMC Annual Meeting

Annual member’s meeting to be held on Aug. 12 at a new location 

In accordance with Southwest Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation bylaws, each year the Cooperative holds a meeting of the members on the second Friday of August. This year’s event takes place at a new venue, the Jackson Fairgrounds Park in Jackson, Tenn.

“We are excited about the opportunities that the Jackson Fair Grounds Park provides for us,” says STEMC president Kevin Murphy. “It is centrally located for our members and is easy to find. The facility also gives us much more indoor space to help avoid the August heat.”

At the annual meeting, STEMC members receive reports from STEMC staff regarding the Cooperative’s activities during the past year. The results of the annual Board election will be announced as well.

In addition to the business meeting, STEMC will provide entertainment by Mickie Utley, barbeque from Brooksie’s Barn, activities for kids, and some exciting new door prizes.

All members are invited to the annual meeting on Friday evening, August 12, 2011, at the Jackson Fair Grounds Park located at 800 U.S. Highway 45 S. in Jackson, Tenn. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the meeting and entertainment will begin at 7:00 p.m.

Southwest Tennessee Electric is a member-owned not-for-profit electric distribution cooperative that serves 50,000 meters in parts of nine West Tennessee counties.

Haywood County State of the Schools event set for Wednesday
July 27, 2011

One week from today, Director of Schools Marlon King will kick off the new school year with his annual State of the Schools message and convocation.
This year King has secured Governor Bill Haslam’s new Commissioner of Education, Kevin Huffman, as keynote speaker. Huffman has spent nearly two decades working with public education systems as a teacher, lawyer, non-profit executive and non-profit board member. The high school’s show choir will perform and several local leaders who are HHS alumni are also on the program.
The event is next Wednesday morning at 8:30 and will be held at Christ Church.  King says school employees and local leaders will attend the meeting and members of the public are also invited though he cautions that seating is limited.

11-year-old Elvis Fan is West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center’s 10,000th Visitor
July 26, 2011

Taylor Hatch helped her grandparents, Greg & Janice Hatch, choose Tennessee as their vacation destination. “I had written a paper about Elvis and I wanted to see Graceland,” said the 11-year-old from Urbandale, Iowa. After visiting Memphis, the Hatch family was traveling to Nashville before heading home July 20, when they decided to stop at the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center (WTDHC) in Brownsville, Tenn. The decision made Taylor this year’s 10,000th person to visit the Center. She was greeted with applause and presented with a special gift bag full of West Tennessee items, including a Brownsville birdhouse and Tennessee Gold Sauce. Pictured are (from left) WTDHC Center Director Sonia Outlaw-Clark, the Hatch family and Center Advisory Board Members Carolyn Freeman and Jerry Wilson.

Megasite authority elects more officers
July 25, 2011

Mayor Franklin Smith conducted the first meeting of the West Tennessee Megasite Authority Monday. Briefing members on recent megasite news, Smith also conducted an election of additional officers.
Jacksons State’s Dr. Bruce Blanding was elected vice-chairman and Tipton County Mayor Jeff Huffman was elected treasurer.
Tennessee Economic and Community Development’s Jimmy West told the authority that the project has the full support of the governor. Deputy Governor John Morgan has assumed the lead for the administration, according to West.
Kyle Spurgeon, who heads the Jackson Area Chamber of Commerce and the Jackson Regional Development District, said a study has been completed and a five-year strategy has been suggested for marketing. “No marketing will actually take place until we know the infrastructure will be available within 18 months,” Spurgeon said. He said the study suggests the site is best suited for an original equipment manufacturer (OEM), a solar component industry, advanced food processing operation or an auto company.
Spurgeon said the “framework” for marketing and the marketing budget is in place. “We’ll pull the trigger when the infrastructure is ready”, Spurgeon said.
Smith said an agreement in principle has been reached for supplying water to the site.  Haywood County will own the potable water system and Brownsville will own the wastewater operations. The Brownsville Energy Authority will operate the systems. Smith said a contract has not been signed for the deal.
Millington Telephone Company is designing a system that will bring broadband Internet access to the region.
The authority will meet again August 26th at Jackson State. Smith said he plans to provide a draft of by-laws for the group at the next meeting.

 

Shop Tax Free In Tennessee
August 5-7 sales tax free shopping

The Department of Revenue is reminding Tennesseans the sixth annual Sales Tax Holiday is scheduled for Friday, August 5 through Sunday, August 7.
Tennessee shoppers during these three days of savings can save nearly10 percent on tax-free clothing, school and art supplies and computer purchases.
“The annual Sales Tax Holiday was designed with Tennessee families in mind, providing savings for families, especially as students begin to prepare for the upcoming school year,” Gov. Bill Haslam said. “
The holiday begins Friday, August 5 at 12:01 a.m. and ends Sunday, August 7 at 11:59 p.m. During the designated three-day weekend, consumers will not pay state or local sales tax on select clothing with a price of $100 or less per item, school and art supplies with a price of $100 or less per item, and computers with a price of $1,500 or less.
“As in years past, last year’s tax-free weekend was very successful, providing Tennessee taxpayers nearly $8.6 million in tax savings,” said Revenue Commissioner Richard H. Roberts. “We are hopeful that all Tennessee shoppers will take advantage of the tax relief provided by the
2011 Sales Tax Holiday.”

Please visit the Sales Tax Holiday Web site at www.tntaxholiday.com to learn more about the items exempt from sales tax. The Tennessee Department of Revenue also assists consumers via e-mail,
[email protected], and through its toll-free statewide telephone hot line, (800) 342-1003. Staff is available to answer questions Monday through Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central Time. (Out-of-state and
Nashville-area callers, please dial (615) 253-0600.)

Examples of exempt items include:
Clothing: Shirts, dresses, pants, coats, gloves and mittens,
hats and caps, hosiery, neckties, belts, sneakers, shoes, uniforms whether athletic or non-athletic and scarves
· School Supplies: Binders, book bags, calculators, tape,
chalk, crayons, erasers, folders, glue, pens, pencils, lunch boxes, notebooks, paper, rulers and scissors
· Art Supplies: Clay and glazes; acrylic, tempera and oil
paints; paintbrushes for artwork; sketch and drawing pads; and watercolors
· Computers: Central processing unit (CPU), along with various other components including monitor, keyboard, mouse, cables to connect components and preloaded software (Note: While the CPU may be purchased
separately, other items must be part of a bundled computer package in order to be eligible.) iPads and other tablet computers are eligible for tax exemption, while video games and consoles are not.

 

 

Tennessee Downtowns Program Launches in Brownsville
Tennessee Main Street Program Director, National Trust Main Street Officer Conduct On-Site Assessment
July 23, 2011

Tennessee Main Street Program Director Kimberly Nyberg, National Trust Main Street Center Officer Kathy LaPlante and Bridgett Massengill, Massengill Consulting, conducted an initial assessment visit in Brownsville July 19, to launch the Tennessee Downtowns program. Brownsville is one of 12 communities selected to participate in Tennessee Downtowns, a competitive community improvement program for cities and counties seeking to revitalize traditional commercial districts.

“The National Trust Main Street Center applauds Brownsville for embracing the revitalization of its downtown commercial district, and we look forward to hearing many success stories here and across the state as a result of Tennessee Downtowns,” said LaPlante.

Tennessee Downtowns is a tiered program affiliated with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development’s Tennessee Main Street Program. Communities selected to participate in Tennessee Downtowns are home to downtown commercial districts established at least 50 years ago and have demonstrated their readiness to organize efforts for downtown revitalization based on the successful “Main Street Four-Point Approach to Downtown Revitalizationtm.”

“Tennessee Downtowns is a unique opportunity for Brownsville to take the initial steps toward revitalizing its downtown business district,” said Nyberg. “I would like to congratulate Brownsville again on being selected to participate in Tennessee Downtowns and look forward to working with you in the coming months.”

Main Street revitalization is a comprehensive, incremental, self-help economic strategy that also focuses on developing public-private partnerships to enhance community livability and job creation, while maintaining the historic character of the district. For information about the Main Street Program and the Main Street Four Point Approach, visit http://www.preservationnation.org/main-street/about-main-street/.

Tennessee’s Main Street program provides communities with technical assistance and guidance in developing long-term strategies that promote economic growth and development. The program provides information and assistance in forging public networking and training opportunities for downtown commercial districts.

For more information about Tennessee Downtowns, visit www.tennesseemainstreet.org.

About the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development’s mission is to develop strategies which help make Tennessee the No. 1 location in the Southeast for high quality jobs. The department seeks to attract new corporate investment in Tennessee and works with Tennessee companies to facilitate expansion and economic growth. To find out more, go to www.tn.gov/ecd.

Brownsville’s Tennessee Downtowns Steering Committee met with Tennessee Main Street Program Director Kimberly Nyberg, National Trust Main Street Center Officer Kathy LaPlante and Bridgett Massengill, Massengill Consulting, July 19, to do an initial site assessment and officially launch the Tennessee Downtowns program in Brownsville. Pictured (from left) are Hayden Hooper, Pat Cummins, Nyberg, Pat Bailey, John Ashworth, Sonia Outlaw-Clark, Sharon Hayes, Andrea Barbour, Albert Campbell, LaPlante, Mayor Jo Matherne and Massengill.

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________
HAYWOOD COUNTY SCHOOLS
Coaching Assignment
2011-12
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
All athletic coaching assignments are contingent upon the coach’s performance; therefore, an assessment will be conducted on an annual basis to determine the need for continuation of the assignment or release from the assignment.

HHS Football Head Coach
Slade Calhoun

HHS Golf – Girls
Chris Messer  

HHS Football Assistant Coach
Justin Kemper
Johnny Wilson
Knox Baggett
Grady Baggett
VACANT
VACANT (freshman)

HHS Golf – Boys
Chris Messer  

HHS Basketball Varsity – Girls
Zandra Jones

HHS Basketball Varsity – Girls
Assistant Coach
 Stephen Korpi
Buffie Turner

HHS Basketball Varsity – Boys
Kendall Dancy

HHS Basketball Varsity – Boys
Assistant Coach
Rodney Chatman
Grover Harwell   

HHS Freshman Basketball – Girls
 Stephen Korpi  

HHS Cross Country
Matthew Shearon

HHS Freshman Basketball – Boys
Rodney Chatman

HJH Football Head Coach
Ernie Jackson   

HHS Soccer – Girls
Jessica Morgan

HJH Football Assistant Coach
William Grissom
VACANT

HHS Soccer – Boys
 David Black

 

HHS Volleyball Head Coach
Daniel Springfield   

HJH Basketball – Girls
Buffie Turner  

HHS Volleyball Assistant Coach
Amanda Britt

HJH Basketball – Boys
Grover Harwell

HHS Baseball Head Coach
Chris Messer  

HJH Soccer – Girls
Humberto Aguilar

HHS Baseball Assistant Coach
VACANT

HJH Soccer – Boys
Humberto Aguilar

HHS Softball Head Coach
Holly Pipkin

HJH Volleyball – Girls
Dave Rogers

HHS Softball Assistant Coach
Amanda Britt

HJH Softball Head Coach
Amanda Britt

HHS Tennis Coach
Stark Davis

HJH Tennis Head Coach
Julian Stanz

HHS Track Head Coach – Girls
Matthew Shearon

HJH Cheer Coach/Football
 Kimberly Youngman

HHS Track Head Coach – Boys
Matthew Shearon

HJH Cheer Coach/Football
Jimmie Wilson

HHS Cheer Coach Football
Jennifer Emerson
Elizabeth Lovelace

HHS Cheer Coach Basketball
Shalondria Hardin
Tanesha Walker

 

 

County commission discusses 2011/2012 budget
July 20, 2011

Seventeen of twenty Haywood County Commissioners met in regular session on a muggy Monday evening at the Courthouse. They raced through regular reports and reports of standing committees to discuss at length the current budget and staffing issues related to the Justice Complex.

Noting that the Budget Committee has now met and preliminarily considered proposed budgets for every department excepting county highways for 2011 – 2012, Budget Committee Chairman Allen King reported that preliminary figures indicate the committee will have a budget gap to fill before recommending the final number to the county commission. “We are going to ask the people of Haywood County for a [property] tax increase, and it may take a wheel tax increase.”

Mayor Smith, Commissioner and Police Chief Chris Lea, and Sheriff Melvin Bond reported on the recent joint meeting of the Jail Committee and the Public Safety Committee at the Justice Complex with County Technical Advisory Service jail staffing consultants Jim Hart and Terry Hazzard.

They produced an analysis of the Justice Complex staffing needs and recommended a total of 38 full time employees to run the facility.

Sheriff Bond has subsequently met with a warden at a penitentiary in Middle Tennessee who has advised a staff of 30 can do the job.

In light of the tight budget, Commissioner Robert Green stated that the Commission suggested revisiting the cost of inmate healthcare.

The county’s budget committee meets this week with the Haywood County Highway Department and Sheriff Bond is expected to finalize his budget by late week.


Haywood County has shot at new jobs!
July 20, 2011

Mayor Franklin Smith informed the Haywood County Commission about two potential industrial prospects for Brownsville and Haywood County. The commission met Monday night.

The first is Marathon Industries, a Del Rio Texas firm that has been a competitor of Haywood Element. Haywood Element recently closed, eliminating about 30 local jobs. Marathon is considering the purchase of Haywood Element’s plant and equipment. If it decides to do so and locate in Brownsville, the company will transfer manufacturing equipment from Erie, Pennsylvania.

Anticipating the cost of that transfer at approximately $105,000, Marathon is negotiating with the City of Brownsville and Haywood County to defray about half of that cost, with the city and county to contribute $25,000 each.

County Commissioners unanimously voted to contribute $25,000 to the transfer of Marathon’s equipment if the project becomes a reality. Marathon anticipates the need for 50 to 70 employees to run the plant in Brownsville.

The second prospect is a Japanese firm, which is a supplier for a transformer manufacturing concern of Mitsubishi. Executives of the firm are coming to Brownsville on July 22nd to look at two sites in the old industrial park and to meet with Mayor Smith and Brownsville Mayor Jo Matherne. Tennessee submitted 26 communities as possible locations, and the company has winnowed those to two, looking at Ripley and Brownsville. They are also looking at sites in Crittenden County, Arkansas, and De Soto County, Mississippi, and apparently will make their selection from these four.

Wherever the factory locates, there will be a $100 million capital investment and the creation of 60 jobs projected to be available sometime in 2014.

Brownsville approves final budget
July 18, 2011

The City of Brownsville Mayor and Board of Aldermen held the July meeting at City Hall.

Although Mayor Matherne opened the meeting to public comment on three pending ordinances, there was none and all three passed unanimously. The first established vehicle impoundment provisions enabling the city to collect $25 per day on impounded vehicles until they are sold. The second raised to $75 the permit fee for temporary peddling and soliciting. The third was more significant: a ten and a half million-dollar budget for the general fund for fiscal year 2011 – 2012.

There is no property tax increase built into this year’s budget.

New Wave sale pending,
The board passed a resolution approving the assignment of the cable television franchise for Brownsville from New Wave to Time Warner Cable. Time Warner recently entered into an agreement to purchase the assets of New Wave.

Budget makers OK Haywood County Schools budget
July 12, 2011

The Haywood County Commission Budget Committee met in called session on Thursday afternoon with Superintendent of Schools Marlon King and Chief Financial Officer Vincent Harvell to consider the proposed $25.8 million education budget for the 2011 – 2012 school year.

Just under $6 million of the total is funded by local taxes and revenue. Almost $2 million of the total is slated for transportation, including salaries and equipment for busing children during the school year.

While the overall proposed budget is very close to that of the previous two years, noteworthy is the increasing burden of health and dental insurance costs for personnel in the school system. Better than $1.5 million of the education budget is allocated for medical and dental insurance, well over ten per cent of the salaries for teachers, administrators, and assistants.

The Budget Committee unanimously recommended passage of the budget as presented.

Southern Gospel “Concert on the Porch” July 16

The West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center’s summer concert series continues with a Southern Gospel concert Saturday evening, July 16. The free concert will begin at 7 p.m., and features Brownsville’s own David Smith and His Voice of Ripley, Tenn.

Known locally as the Singing Firefighter, Smith loves to sing the old southern gospel favorites like “How Great Thou Art” and “In the Garden,” mixed with more modern tunes such as “What Kinda Car.”

“His Voice” is a Southern Gospel Trio that includes Larry Kelly of Ripley, Candace Maness of Nutbush, and Mitch Platz of Brownsville. The group has been performing together since 2010.

This event is one the entire family will enjoy and is presented from the porch of the Sleepy John Estes home. There will be some bleacher seating and attendees are also encouraged to bring their lawn chairs and blankets. Popcorn, hot dogs, chips and drinks will be available

For more information about the concert, contact Outlaw-Clark at 731-779-9000. The West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center is located at I-40 and Exit 56, behind McDonald’s, and features three museums. Visit the Center’s website at www.westtnheritage.com.

Brownsville attends Downtown Revitalization Workshop
July 8, 2011

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development hosted a two-day Downtown Revitalization Workshop in Nashville June 27-28. Representatives from Tennessee’s 24 Main Street Program communities and 12 newly selected Tennessee Downtowns communities attended the free educational workshop, which was made possible through a $50,000 sponsorship from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development.

The second round of Tennessee Downtowns communities was announced in December and included Brownsville. Members of the Brownsville Tennessee Downtowns Steering Committee who attended the workshop are Sharon Hayes, Pat Cummins, John Ashworth, Pat Bailey and Sonia Outlaw-Clark.

The second round of Tennessee Downtowns communities was announced in December and included Brownsville. Members of the Brownsville Tennessee Downtowns Steering Committee who attended the workshop are Sharon Hayes, Pat Cummins, John Ashworth, Pat Bailey and Sonia Outlaw-Clark.

“Revitalizing downtown commercial districts enhances the quality of life for our citizens and makes our communities more attractive to business investment,” said Commissioner Bill Hagerty, Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development. “I congratulate our Tennessee Main Street and Tennessee Downtowns program participants on their hard work and dedication to making their communities even better places to live and work.”

The 2010 Community Reinvestment Statistics reported Tennessee Main Street Program communities generating more than $89 million in public and private investment in downtown districts, creating 400 net new jobs, 94 net new businesses and 222 building rehabilitation projects.

Main Street revitalization is a comprehensive, incremental, self-help economic strategy that also focuses on developing public-private partnerships to enhance community livability and job creation, while maintaining the historic character of the district.

For more information about Tennessee Main Street Program and Tennessee Downtowns, visit www.tennesseemainstreet.org.

Haywood County farmers to get additional help from government
June 29, 2011

Haywood County farmers may benefit from a recent federal disaster declaration.

Governor Bill Haslam announced that U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack has designated 15 counties natural disaster areas. The declaration is a result of crop damage blamed on storms and flooding in April and May.

Counties designated as primary natural disaster areas include Dyer, Giles, Greene, Hancock, Hardeman, Hardin, Hawkins, Henderson, Knox, Lake, Madison, Obion, Shelby, Tipton and Washington.

The disaster rules allows farmers in primary and adjoining counties to apply for payments to help recover lost income.

Adjoining counties where farmers can also apply for assistance include , in the brownsvilleradio.com immediate area include, Crockett Fayette, Gibson, Haywood and Lauderdale.

Workforce at Haywood County Jail to be assessed by CTAS
June 29, 2011

Sheriff Melvin Bond says he’s made a date with the County Technical Advisory Service to help him assess the number of workers he needs at the county jail. Bond sais CTAS told him their jail expert, Jim Hart, will conduct the survey July 12.

Bond and other county leaders, especially those working to hold the line on the county’s 2011/2012 budget, are focusing on personnel issues at the new jail located in the Justice Complex.

Bond says the CTAS assessment may help him decide the proper workforce.

Jim Frazier steps down as Haywood athletic director
June 27, 2011

Director of Schools Marlon King says long-time Haywood County Schools athletic director Jim Frazier says he’d like to be retire from his position as the school system’s athletic director Frazier is the principal of Anderson Early Childhood Center and told King he’d like to focus solely on his role at the school.

Drayton Hawkins will replace Frazier.

King also said Rodney “Duke” Chatman, a HHS alumni and former Tomcat basketball player has been appointed assistant varsity boy’s coach and freshman boy’s coach.

Haywood County target shooters score high
June 14, 2011

Haywood County’s crack target shooting team, The Young Guns, have been at it again.

The varsity and jr varsity teams are again the state’s regional skeet shooting champs. The shotgunners have been competing in the Tennessee Wildlife Federation’s Scholastic Shooting Competition.

The varsity team scored 279 (hit 279 targets out of 300). The junior varsity shot 269.

Will Taylor of Brownsville was the region’s top shooter, breaking 98 out of 100 targets. Hayden Combs was second, scoring 97 out of 100.

This is the third year in a row the two teams have won the regional tournament. They will advance to statewide competition.

Brownsville’s budget balanced — no property tax increase
June 15, 2011

Brownsville Mayor Jo Matherne and the Board of Aldermen met in regular session Tuesday afternoon at City Hall. Before dealing with next year’s budget, the Board first passed first reading on two ordinances. The first allows Brownsville to recoup expenses on impounded vehicles prior to forwarding the proceeds from their sale to the state of Tennessee. The expenses will be recouped by charging an impound fee of $25 per day until the vehicle is sold. The second ordinance sets the fee for annual permits for soliciting and peddling at $75.

Aldermen and the mayor passed first reading on the proposed 2011 – 2012 Brownsville budget. The proposed budget represents a very slight spending increase from the previous year, but it includes no property tax increase.

Notable budget provisions for the new year include the reestablishment of a revolving loan fund for small businesses.
The proposed budget will reappear at next month’s meeting for a second reading and passage into law.

June “Concert on the Porch” to feature Hannah Company, Jupiter Stone

BROWNSVILLE, TN (June 12, 2011): The West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center in Brownsville, Tenn., will present the second in its summer concert series “Concert on the Porch” Saturday, June 25, at 7 p.m.. The free concert will feature two bands with Brownsville ties, Hannah Company and Jupiter Stone.

Hannah Company made its musical debut at this year’s Cinco de Mayo Heritage Celebration. Members of the group include Hannah Baynes, Andrew Cooper and Amy and Joe Mallette. Since May, the rock group has enjoyed playing at private parties and other local events.

The members of Jupiter Stone consider themselves “students of music.” Each member brings a different musical style to the group and they mesh to form a modern appeal, bridging generations with their rock and rhythm and blues mix. The band spends its weekends playing in and around Jackson and Memphis and has released a CD, simply titled “Jupiter Stone.” Band members are Josh and Steven Stewart of Brownsville, David Aplin and Kenny Napper.

Concert on the Porch is a family-friendly event and both groups promise something for all ages. You are invited to bring your lawn chairs and enjoy this free evening concert. Grilled hot dogs, drinks and popcorn will be available. You may also pack a picnic or visit one of the nearby restaurants.

Concert on the Porch is a free summer concert series featuring guest artists performing from the porch of Blues legend Sleepy John Estes, located on the grounds of the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center. The Center is located behind McDonald’s off of Hwy. 76 South and Interstate 40 at Exit 56. For a complete list of summer concerts and more information, visit www.westtnheritage.com , or call 731-779-9000.

Solar Farm connection hearing
June 13, 2011

Interested in how the solar farm will eventually be connected to the power grid?

There’s a public hearing on the subject set for Thursday.

Representatives of the University of Tennessee Research Foundation and Chickasaw Electric Cooperative are hosting a public hearing Thursday morning. The meeting is at 9am in the old Circuit Court Room on the second floor of the Haywood County Courthouse.

The interconnection route of lines will take the power along Albright Road to Yum Yum Road to Joyner Campground Road and along Highway 76 South to the Dancyville substation.

The solar far is located on Albright Road near Interstate 40 in Haywood County.

Brownsville poised to approve new budget
No new taxes
June 10, 2011

The city board met in special session “budget workshop” session Wednesday. The four aldermen and the Mayor met for over an hour to discuss the proposed budget that will be presented for first reading at the regular June meeting of the City Board on June14.

Highlights on the budget include:

  • No property tax increase
  • A 2% raise for Brownsville employees and a potential additional 1% merit raise at the discretion of department heads, as well as a Christmas bonus
  • A projected 32% increase in gasoline costs for city government for the upcoming year
  • Reestablishment of the restricted revolving loan fund
  • The replacement of 3 police cars with new vehicles
  • City utilities expansion across interstate 40
  • Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) disaster mitigation funding for
  • Completion of the roadscape and court square landscaping projects.

Most city departments are projected to be funded at very close to previous year levels.

Property tax revenues are projected to be slightly above the 2010 budget, whereas sales tax revenues are projected to be somewhat lower in the upcoming 2011 -12 budget.

The public is invited to attend the June 14 City Board Meeting on Tuesday of next week when the proposed budget will be presented and discussed in detail.

Lagoon Creek power — enough for 320,000 homes
June 10, 2011

X literally marked the spot — the spot where gas lines and high capacity electric power lines crossed in Haywood County. The intersecting power supplies are near Nutbush and Lagoon Creek in Northwest Haywood County.

Just a few years ago it became the spot where power-generating companies, both public and private, came to look — searching for an efficient place to locate their electricity generators that would be run by natural gas.

Thursday TVA dedicated its $440 million combined cycle generating facility. Touted as highly efficient —the Lagoon Creek power plant sits across the field from another, older TVA facility.

TVA officials said the new Haywood County generator is the “most efficient in the TVA fleet.”

What makes it special? Heat from the natural gas driven turbines is recycled to drive secondary turbines. The result, TVA says, is enough power for 320,000 homes.

Mayor Franklin Smith says TVA is Haywood County’s largest taxpayer. In addition to the two plants in northwest Haywood County, TVA also operates a third facility near I-40’s Exit 60. TVA pays over $300,000 annually in property taxes, having agreed to pay the same amount as private industry for the south-county power producer.

Smith said TVA has paid more than a half-million dollars in “impact fees” to county government while the plant was under construction.

Some other facts:

  • Construction started in September 2007.
  • Completion required more than 1000 construction employees that worked for more than 2 years.
  • Bad weather and the discovery of a very old cemetery containing 27 graves slowed construction by about 100 days.
  • More than 30,000 yards of concrete and 3,000 tons of reinforcing rods were used during construction.
  • There is an estimated 1.5 million feet of electrical cable at the site.
  • The plant is 50% more efficient than a “simple cycle” plant that does not recycle heat.
  • TVA’s other plant at the Lagoon Creek site includes 12 “simple cycle” gas fired turbines.
  • The new has been in operation since last fall and has run “twice” as much as TVA expected.
  • TVA employs approximately forty people to operate the two plants at Lagoon Creek.
  • A second combined cycle plant is being built in East Tennessee.

Long time coming — downtown renovations finally start
June 7, 2011

City street workers were busy closing lanes of traffic and workers were marking underground utilities Tuesday in preparation for downtown Brownsville’s makeover.

Grants totaling about $750,000 will be spent to improve traffic flow, parking and aesthetics.

Mayor Jo Matherne said the work would take 90 to 12 days to complete.

Free Fishing Day and annual rodeo planned for June 11

The Jackson Center for Independent Living will sponsor its annual Free Fishing Rodeo June 11 at Oneal Lake on the Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge. This is held each year in conjunction with Tennessee’s Free Fishing Day; a day when residents and non-residents regardless of age can fish without a license in Tennessee’s public waters.

The event begins at 8 a.m. until noon, and will include fishing, kid’s crafts and lunch. Prizes and awards will be presented. Bring your own fishing poles, rod and reel, etc. or one will be provided for you. Bait will also be provided. You do not have to be disabled to participate in this fishing rodeo. Everyone is invited.

This is the seventh year for the event, according to Beth James, executive director of the Jackson program. “Each year approximately 30-40 children have participated,” says James. “This year we’d like to see this number increase while also helping to make the community more aware of the services we provide.”

JCIL was established in 1996 and is part of a world wide network of non-profit organizations operated by people with disabilities for people with disabilities. JCIL serves an eight county region including Haywood County.

For more information about the event, contact Beth James at 731-668-2211. You can also learn more about JCIL by visiting its website: www.i-cil.com.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *